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The Types of Tender Documents

June 15, 2021

Blog

The Types of Tender Documents

June 15, 2021

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Onderwerp: Gids

Niveau: Beginner

3 minuten leestijd

When first approaching the topic of tendering as something your company could benefit from (link to the article about benefits of tendering for a company), you will come across many abbreviations used for different types of tenders and tendering documents. Although they may sound intimidating, tender documents are quite straightforward in what it is they encompass. Understanding what these documents entail can help you map out your tenders and their respective tendering process in a clearer way. In this article, we’ll look into the different documents in the tendering process.

European Single Procurement Document (ESPD)

The ESPD aims to simplify public procurement for all EU member states. Essentially, the ESPD is a self-declaration form, allowing firms to self-declare that they meet the necessary criteria required by the contracting authority. It replaces the previous way of having to submit various documents before being able to bid in the tendering process for public contracts.

Expression of Interest (EoI)

In the EoI, the contracting authority requests an expression of interest from potential suppliers in the qualification part of the tendering process. It involves tenderers being asked whether they’d consider formally bidding for a tender.

Pre-Qualification Questionnaire (PQQ)

PQQs resemble an application form that needs to be filled in by the tendering company at the beginning of the tendering process. Information requested by PQQ’s involve the basics (e.g. name, type of company), but also questions revolving around environmental policies, finance, equality, GDPR…etc. This document acts as a filter, ensuring that the most qualified tenderers go through to the next stage of the tendering process.

Invitation to Tender (ITT)

The ITT is a document provided by the contracting authority which invites certain shortlisted organizations to bid for a certain project. These may be based on the PQQ (in the case of public tenders), as well as price, availability, and presumed delivery times. The composition of ITTs differs in complexity depending on the type of project at hand.

Request for Tender (RFT)

The RFT document formally invites potential suppliers to bid on tenders in a structured way.

Request for Proposal (RFP)

The RFP document is written by the contracting authority and provides information about a tendering project, the contract terms, and how tenders are evaluated, while also requesting bids from tenderers who are willing to complete the project. These are primarily used when contracting authorities are ready to evaluate multiple factors before making their selection of a tenderer.

Request for Quotation (RFQ)

The RFQ document is submitted by contracting authorities to one or more tenderers requesting quotations for the potential supply of goods and services. Typically, they expect a breakdown of prices.

Request for Information (RFI)

An RFI is submitted if the contracting authority wants to know more information about their potential suppliers. These are typically followed by further requests for other documentations (e.g. RFQ or RFP).

Pricing document

The tender pricing document breaks down the prices of the tender provided by the tenders’ contracting authority. It is usually presented in the form of a cost plan, with certain costs being broken down further for clarification (e.g. staff costs). These breakdowns can be split in terms of direct costs, indirect costs, and profit.

Form of tender

The form of tender is a form where the tenderer fills in the details required by the contracting authority. It formally acknowledges that the tenderer understands and abides by what the tender contracts involve. The information a tenderer may be required to fill in involves date, name, address, tender reference number, qualifications, the period of time allocated to the tendering project, and the bearer of costs, amongst others.

Contract conditions

Delineates the tenders’ conditions that both parties are to legally stand by throughout the tendering process. These can generally be seen as the ‘rules of the tender’s agreement and discusses the relationship between the tenderer and the contracting authority. While each of the tenders is unique, most contract conditions are similar, and follow the typical standard form for contract conditions.

At Altura, we know that tendering documentation can get heavy, complex, and complicated. As such, our tender platform allows easy, optimized searching through tender documents. Users can preview, locate relevant keywords, and download the documents all on one page.

When first approaching the topic of tendering as something your company could benefit from (link to the article about benefits of tendering for a company), you will come across many abbreviations used for different types of tenders and tendering documents. Although they may sound intimidating, tender documents are quite straightforward in what it is they encompass. Understanding what these documents entail can help you map out your tenders and their respective tendering process in a clearer way. In this article, we’ll look into the different documents in the tendering process.

European Single Procurement Document (ESPD)

The ESPD aims to simplify public procurement for all EU member states. Essentially, the ESPD is a self-declaration form, allowing firms to self-declare that they meet the necessary criteria required by the contracting authority. It replaces the previous way of having to submit various documents before being able to bid in the tendering process for public contracts.

Expression of Interest (EoI)

In the EoI, the contracting authority requests an expression of interest from potential suppliers in the qualification part of the tendering process. It involves tenderers being asked whether they’d consider formally bidding for a tender.

Pre-Qualification Questionnaire (PQQ)

PQQs resemble an application form that needs to be filled in by the tendering company at the beginning of the tendering process. Information requested by PQQ’s involve the basics (e.g. name, type of company), but also questions revolving around environmental policies, finance, equality, GDPR…etc. This document acts as a filter, ensuring that the most qualified tenderers go through to the next stage of the tendering process.

Invitation to Tender (ITT)

The ITT is a document provided by the contracting authority which invites certain shortlisted organizations to bid for a certain project. These may be based on the PQQ (in the case of public tenders), as well as price, availability, and presumed delivery times. The composition of ITTs differs in complexity depending on the type of project at hand.

Request for Tender (RFT)

The RFT document formally invites potential suppliers to bid on tenders in a structured way.

Request for Proposal (RFP)

The RFP document is written by the contracting authority and provides information about a tendering project, the contract terms, and how tenders are evaluated, while also requesting bids from tenderers who are willing to complete the project. These are primarily used when contracting authorities are ready to evaluate multiple factors before making their selection of a tenderer.

Request for Quotation (RFQ)

The RFQ document is submitted by contracting authorities to one or more tenderers requesting quotations for the potential supply of goods and services. Typically, they expect a breakdown of prices.

Request for Information (RFI)

An RFI is submitted if the contracting authority wants to know more information about their potential suppliers. These are typically followed by further requests for other documentations (e.g. RFQ or RFP).

Pricing document

The tender pricing document breaks down the prices of the tender provided by the tenders’ contracting authority. It is usually presented in the form of a cost plan, with certain costs being broken down further for clarification (e.g. staff costs). These breakdowns can be split in terms of direct costs, indirect costs, and profit.

Form of tender

The form of tender is a form where the tenderer fills in the details required by the contracting authority. It formally acknowledges that the tenderer understands and abides by what the tender contracts involve. The information a tenderer may be required to fill in involves date, name, address, tender reference number, qualifications, the period of time allocated to the tendering project, and the bearer of costs, amongst others.

Contract conditions

Delineates the tenders’ conditions that both parties are to legally stand by throughout the tendering process. These can generally be seen as the ‘rules of the tender’s agreement and discusses the relationship between the tenderer and the contracting authority. While each of the tenders is unique, most contract conditions are similar, and follow the typical standard form for contract conditions.

At Altura, we know that tendering documentation can get heavy, complex, and complicated. As such, our tender platform allows easy, optimized searching through tender documents. Users can preview, locate relevant keywords, and download the documents all on one page.

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